tomkirk
audrey // quế anh // cannelle

i'm in a thrilling brolationship with chey baby and brookie. they just don't know it yet.

also not that interesting, but if you wanna talk go for it

asylum-art:

Antoine Cordet Paintings

Artist on Tumblr, Saatchi Art, Facebook

A striking feature of Antoine Cordet’s body of work is that nearly all of his subjects are male. In an image culture where the bare, female body is used as a story-telling medium in everything from art to advertising, this aspect of Cordet’s work is refreshing. The Parisian painter’s artworks resemble discarded party polaroids that have taken a serious beating. Snapshot-like portraits of dejected youths, the paintings spell out agony and confusion with muddled brushstrokes and dripping paint splatters — like a visualization of a secret quickly whispered in passing. See more of Cordet’s paintings below.

fryemuseum:

Julius Scheuerer (German, 1859-1913)
Peacock, 1907

Oil on canvas
36 1/2 x 24 1/2 in.
Charles and Emma Frye Collection, 1952.148

mmcoconut:

Wanted to do a comic thing but failed…

Punch me in the face if I draw him again please

instagram:

Capturing the Moods of the Sea with @rochajuliana

For more photos from Copacabana’s moody shorelines, follow @rochajuliana on Instagram.

“I am not sure where Copacabana beach ends and Juliana begins,” says Brazil Instagrammer Juliana Rocha (@rochajuliana) of her #copacabanasentimental photo project. Each day, Juliana shoots Rio de Janeiro’s Copacabana beach in an attempt to capture the beach’s daily moods through photography and witty captions.

Although she’s originally from Brazil’s Northeastern state of Ceará, Juliana has always felt a draw to Copacabana over the eight years that she has lived in Rio. “The beach is the place where the ocean meets the sky,” she says. “Its infinite nature symbolizes everything that is unknown about life.” Her photo series began on a day when she came up with what she describes as an “infuriated” sea. From then on, she felt increasingly in tune with the waters. “In the beginning,” she explains, “I was able to separate my emotions from the emotions of the sea. Today, it’s as if my feelings and the emotion in the photos blend together completely.”